Book highlights ‘a vaccine component that can be especially complicated’ for a child with compromised immune system

Posted: February 28, 2019 in Vaccine Science Revisited
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In researching VACCINE SCIENCE REVISITED: Are Childhood Immunizations As Safe As Claimed?, we discovered the differences between subunit, conjugate and recombinant vaccines don’t seem to be clearly understood by many we’ve come across in the medical field.

In an early chapter titled ‘Altered Germs’ we advise readers that “subunit vaccines use only portions of the germ or as the NIH website explains it, they ‘include only the antigens that best stimulate the immune system’.”

An excerpt from the chapter follows. (Research paper link numbers retained):

The conjugate vaccines, on the other hand, use only the bacterial sugar coat in order to “disguise a bacterium’s antigens so that the immature immune systems of infants and younger children can’t recognize or respond to them.”2 The coating also contains the information that makes us sick.

But this is not an actual germ, so if it is just injected into the body by itself, we won’t recognize how dangerous the coating is. To solve this problem, the scientists attach it to a toxic molecule that will stir up our immune system. In order to attach the coating to the toxin, they need other chemicals to finish the job. By using a chemical, the coating material attaches to a carrier protein. Examples of these types of vaccines are the Hib, HPV, pneumococcal and meningococcal vaccines.

The recombinant vaccines, use carriers or vectors “to introduce microbial DNA to cells of the body.”3 These carriers/vectors are weakened viruses or bacteria, meaning they mix and match DNA from different sources into one germ or cell.

There are different ways to produce these vaccines. One way is to isolate a specific piece from a germ and use it in the vaccine. Another way is via genetic engineering. Here the germ is inserted into plasmid that has been manipulated by scientists. This type of plasmid is circular segments of DNA extracted from bacteria to serve as a vector. Scientists can add multiple genes and whatever genes they want into this plasmid. In case of vaccines, this includes a genetic piece of the vaccine germ and normally a gene for antibiotic resistance.

This means that when the toxic gene is cultured inside the yeast, it has been designed with a new genetic code that makes it resistant to the antibiotic it’s coded for.

The gene-plasmid combo is inserted into a yeast cell to be replicated. When the yeast replicates, the DNA from the plasmid is reproduced as a part of the yeast DNA. Once enough cells have been replicated, the genetic material in the new and improved yeast cell is extracted and put into the vaccine. Examples of this vaccine are the acellular pertussis and hepatitis B vaccines.

One thing that doesn’t seem to concern scientists is the fact that the manmade genetic combination becomes the vaccine component. This mixture of intended and unintended genetic information may cause our immune system to overreact. This can be especially complicated for a child with compromised immune system.

 

VACCINE SCIENCE REVISITED: Are Childhood Immunizations As Safe As Claimed? (The Underground Knowledge Series Book 8) by [Morcan, James, Morcan, Lance]

This new release book is available now via Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07MQTN3CG/

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