Posts Tagged ‘Albert Einstein’

When researching geniuses for our book, GENIUS INTELLIGENCE: Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ, we discovered Albert Einstein took long walks around Princeton University when pondering complex equations. He often commented that many of his Eureka moments and creative breakthroughs came to him during these walks.

Albert Einstein at Princeton

Einstein…the walking genius.

Further research revealed that walking — like playing chess or drinking pure water — is another of those genius enhancement activities that potentially fall into the “too obvious” or “too simple” category.

Almost everyone has experienced wrestling with a problem all day then finally giving up and going for a stroll in the fresh air and suddenly receiving the answer unexpectedly and without trying.

Some might explain away this phenomenon as merely being the result of relaxing and defocusing from a problem and thereby allowing the subconscious mind to take over. Or others may simply say that virtually all exercise has been shown to benefit the human brain.

And there are no doubt degrees of truth to those counter points.

However, there may also be a sound scientific explanation as to why this low-impact physical exercise often yields the golden solution. Firstly, there’s a rhythmic flow to walking that puts one almost in a trance-like or meditative state. Secondly, the fact that you are moving two legs and two arms means you are engaging both hemispheres of the brain – people are therefore probably in the whole brain state while walking.

One study at Stanford University showed that subjects came up with more creative ideas during and immediately after a walk compared to those who simply sat at a desk.

Furthermore, a July 31, 2014 article in Psychology Today mentioned that German composer and pianist Ludwig van Beethoven “kept his creative promises by strategically using his time to incubate ideas. His favorite method of thinking things through? Long, solitary walks through the forested valleys of Vienna … Beethoven went for a vigorous walk after lunch, and he always carried a pencil and a couple of sheets of paper in his pocket to record chance musical thoughts.”

And it appears Beethoven and Einstein are not alone among history’s great geniuses. There are other examples.

For those who find walking too boring or just not their cup of tea, other physical exercises could possibly deliver similar results – exercises such as dancing, cycling or running for example.

Athletes, personal fitness trainers and sports medicine professionals are united in their opinion that exercise helps your mental function. Runners experience the pleasant – many say euphoric – runner’s high that comes with intense, sustained exercise. Such exercise (not just running) increases serotonin in the brain, leading to improved mental clarity.

 

To read more about walking and brain development check out GENIUS INTELLIGENCE: Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ http://www.amazon.com/GENIUS-INTELLIGENCE-Techniques-Technologies-Underground-ebook/dp/B00QXQQWXO/

 

GENIUS INTELLIGENCE: Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ (The Underground Knowledge Series Book 1)

 

To view the discussion thread on genius intelligence (the phenomenon) in our ‘Underground Knowledge’ group on Goodreads check out: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/142309-29-conspiracy-theories—a-discussion-group >>> Everyone’s welcome!

 

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While researching our new release book GENIUS INTELLIGENCE: Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ, we were surprised to learn that many of history’s most renowned geniuses were physically ambidextrous, or equally proficient with their right and left hands. These include scientific and artistic giants such as Albert Einstein, Michelangelo, Nikola Tesla and Leonardo da Vinci.

Einstein ambidextrous.

Given that less than 1% of the population are truly ambidextrous, we immediately wondered if that was just a coincidence, or was the ambidexterity of these individuals somehow crucial to the genius abilities each possessed?

Although more research needs to be done and there are some scientists who have suggested undesirable mental traits result from being ambidextrous, brain scans have revealed one telling statistic that may explain the seemingly high instance of geniuses in the ambidextrous population.

That statistic reveals that unlike right-handers, ambidextrous people have almost completely symmetrical brains. Meaning they are naturally in the all-important whole brain state. Right handers, on the other hand, generally have strong left brain dominance. Lefties often have brain symmetry as well, but not to the extent that ambidextrous people do.

You’ll recall throughout Genius Intelligence we have referred to the whole brain mode (aka hemispheric synchronization) being the ideal state for accessing higher intelligences. So, could acquiring ambidexterity be one way of bringing out latent genius abilities?

Digging deeper, we found a Psychology Today article on the history and neuroscience of left-handed, right-handed and ambidextrous people. Published on August 12, 2013, and written by bestselling author and athlete Christopher Bergland, the article surmises that the ultimate state for genius-level intelligence is to create brain symmetry and to be as close as possible to ambidextrous with your hands.

Ambidexterity in motion.

Another article, published in (e) Science News on October 4, 2013, may also offer more specific insights. Headlined Well-connected hemispheres of Einstein’s brain may have sparked his brilliance, the article reports that “The left and right hemispheres of Albert Einstein’s brain were unusually well connected to each other and may have contributed to his brilliance, according to a new study conducted in part by Florida State University evolutionary anthropologist Dean Falk.”

So, if Einstein-like interconnectedness of brain hemispheres is the ultimate goal, then it seems being ambidextrous, or at least developing some ambidextrous traits, may facilitate this brain state.

A few techniques to develop ambidexterity include: write and draw with the wrong hand (i.e. left hand for Righties and right hand for Lefties); do household tasks with the wrong hand; play musical instruments that involve both hands such as piano, guitar or flute; learn how to juggle.

 

To read more about ambidexterity and intelligence check out GENIUS INTELLIGENCE: Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ http://www.amazon.com/GENIUS-INTELLIGENCE-Techniques-Technologies-Underground-ebook/dp/B00QXQQWXO/

 

GENIUS INTELLIGENCE: Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ (The Underground Knowledge Series Book 1)

 

To view the discussion thread on genius intelligence (the phenomenon) in our ‘Underground Knowledge’ group on Goodreads check out: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/142309-29-conspiracy-theories—a-discussion-group >>> Everyone’s welcome!

 

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A book critic who reviewed our conspiracy thriller novel The Ninth Orphan criticized our protagonist for having an IQ, or intelligence quotient, higher than Einstein’s. The strong implication in the review was that this was a ridiculous character decision we (the authors) had made.

That all sounds like a valid criticism on the surface, but had this critic gone beyond his own sphere of knowledge and done a little research he would have discovered there are many people whose IQ’s have been recorded to be higher than Einstein’s. American author Marilyn Vos Savant, for example, has an IQ of 192; Russian chess grandmaster and former world champion Garry Kasparov has an IQ of 194. Incidentally, Einstein’s IQ was estimated in the 1920’s to between 160 and 190.

Einstein 1921 by F Schmutzer.jpg

Albert Einstein and Marilyn Vos Savant.

But wait, there’s much more when it comes to the world of super geniuses – as we discovered when researching our new release book THE ORPHAN CONSPIRACIES: 29 Conspiracy Theories from The Orphan Trilogy. Here’s an excerpt from the book…

Quite a few individuals have tested in excess of a 200 IQ score, including South Korean civil engineer Kim Ung-yong (210), former child prodigy and former NASA employee Christopher Hirata (225) and Australian mathematician Terence Tao (225-230).

And last but not least is American child prodigy, mathematician and politician William James Sidis who had an IQ of 250-300. He graduated grammar school at age six, went to Harvard University at age 11 and graduated cum laude at the age of 16. Sidis, who died in 1944, could fluently speak 40 languages by the time he reached adulthood.

William James Sidis 1914.jpg

Child prodigy William Sidis…IQ 250-300.

Remember, the average IQ is 100 and approximately 50% of those tested score between 90 and 110. According to the book IQ and the Wealth of Nations by Dr. Richard Lynn and Dr. Tatu Vanhanen, the top five countries in terms of average IQ’s of their citizens are Hong Kong (107), South Korea (106), Japan (105), Taiwan (104) and Singapore (103). Further down the list, China, New Zealand and the UK share equal 12th position with a 100 average, while the US is in 19th position with an average citizen IQ of 98.

However, many scholars in the 21st Century now believe IQ scores aren’t everything and it’s likely areas of intelligence exist that cannot be measured in any test. This is possibly substantiated by the number of successful and iconic individuals who recorded very low IQ scores. These include the once highly articulate and outspoken boxer Muhammad Ali who, as a young man, scored only 78 – an IQ so low it supposedly denotes a mild mental disability!

And of course, the list of the world’s so-called most intelligent excludes extremely bright individuals in impoverished parts of the world where IQ’s are rarely tested. The Indian mathematical genius, Srinivasa Ramanujan (1887-1920), was an example of such incredible geniuses who defy all explanation.

Srinivasa Ramanujan - OPC - 1.jpg

Srinivasa Ramanujan…changed the face of mathematics.

Born into poverty in Erode, India, Ramanujan discovered extraordinary mathematical formulas, despite being self-taught with no formal training in mathematics. He changed the face of mathematics as we know it and left many highly-educated and acclaimed Western mathematicians completely gobsmacked.

Furthermore, the other high-IQ individuals mentioned earlier are only in the top bracket of those who agreed to undergo IQ tests and allow their scores to be published. It’s quite conceivable certain elite individuals belonging to secret societies, mystery schools or intelligence agencies do not reveal their IQ scores. That secret intelligence factor was the basis for our fictional Pedemont orphans who we either state or imply have IQ’s of around 200 or higher.

As a result of the accelerated learning techniques within the diverse curriculum that begins before they can even walk or talk, the orphans can assimilate and retain phenomenal amounts of information. By their teens, the child prodigies possess greater amounts of knowledge than even adult geniuses. They are able to solve complex problems, are fully knowledgeable about almost any current world subject or historical event, and are to all intents and purposes organic supercomputers and human library databases.

Again, our orphans are exposed to highly advanced learning methods so that they will have at their disposal all the necessary skills and information to be able to overcome life-and-death problems that may arise on future espionage assignments. They’re taught there is no challenge or question that cannot be overcome, solved or answered as long as they fully utilize the power of their minds.

Each child at the Pedemont Orphanage eventually becomes a polymath – a person who is beyond a genius. It’s a word we use throughout the trilogy as we felt it best describes the orphans’ off-the-scale intellects.

A polymath is actually a multiple-subject genius. However, the criteria for a polymath is someone who is an expert in vastly different, almost unrelated fields. For example, an artist who works in the film, theatre and literary industries and who is a masterful actor, screenwriter, novelist, film director and film producer would not qualify as a polymath as those fields are all artistic mediums and closely related.

Rather, a polymath is someone who has excelled in, or completely mastered, a variety of unrelated or loosely related subjects. These could be as diverse as economics, dance, architecture, mathematics, history, forensic science, cooking and entomology.

And before you go calling yourself a polymath, don’t forget you must be an expert in each field. Unfortunately being a jack-of-all-trades and master-of-none doesn’t count.

One of the best examples of a polymath is Leonardo da Vinci. Born in Italy in 1452, he was a sculptor, painter, architect, mathematician, musician, engineer, inventor, anatomist, botanist, geologist, cartographer and writer. Although Leonardo received an informal education that included geometry, Latin and mathematics, he was essentially an autodidact, or a self-taught individual.

Francesco Melzi - Portrait of Leonardo - WGA14795.jpg

Leonardo…polymath extraordinaire.

The man who many have called the most diversely talented person who ever lived, left behind an array of masterpieces in the painting world alone, including The Last Supper, Mona Lisa and The Vitruvian Man.

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The Last Supper…another Leonardo masterpiece.

 

Read more in THE ORPHAN CONSPIRACIES: 29 Conspiracy Theories from The Orphan Trilogy – available now via Amazon at: http://www.amazon.com/The-Orphan-Conspiracies-Conspiracy-Theories-ebook/dp/B00J4MPFT6/

A book that’s for the common people.

 

Happy reading! –James & Lance

 

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The Orphan Factory (The Orphan Trilogy, #2)

“The only salvation for civilization lies in the creation of a world government”
–Albert Einstein.

Do you agree with Einstein? Or do you believe individual nations are still important?

These issues are explored in my new release thriller novel, The Orphan Factory (The Orphan Trilogy, #2) http://www.amazon.com/dp/B008M9WWKW/ as well as its predecessor The Ninth Orphan (The Orphan Trilogy, #1) http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0056I4FKC 

 

The Ninth Orphan (The Orphan Trilogy, #1)