Posts Tagged ‘Princeton University’

When researching geniuses for our book, GENIUS INTELLIGENCE: Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ, we discovered Albert Einstein took long walks around Princeton University when pondering complex equations. He often commented that many of his Eureka moments and creative breakthroughs came to him during these walks.

Albert Einstein at Princeton

Einstein…the walking genius.

Further research revealed that walking — like playing chess or drinking pure water — is another of those genius enhancement activities that potentially fall into the “too obvious” or “too simple” category.

Almost everyone has experienced wrestling with a problem all day then finally giving up and going for a stroll in the fresh air and suddenly receiving the answer unexpectedly and without trying.

Some might explain away this phenomenon as merely being the result of relaxing and defocusing from a problem and thereby allowing the subconscious mind to take over. Or others may simply say that virtually all exercise has been shown to benefit the human brain.

And there are no doubt degrees of truth to those counter points.

However, there may also be a sound scientific explanation as to why this low-impact physical exercise often yields the golden solution. Firstly, there’s a rhythmic flow to walking that puts one almost in a trance-like or meditative state. Secondly, the fact that you are moving two legs and two arms means you are engaging both hemispheres of the brain – people are therefore probably in the whole brain state while walking.

One study at Stanford University showed that subjects came up with more creative ideas during and immediately after a walk compared to those who simply sat at a desk.

Furthermore, a July 31, 2014 article in Psychology Today mentioned that German composer and pianist Ludwig van Beethoven “kept his creative promises by strategically using his time to incubate ideas. His favorite method of thinking things through? Long, solitary walks through the forested valleys of Vienna … Beethoven went for a vigorous walk after lunch, and he always carried a pencil and a couple of sheets of paper in his pocket to record chance musical thoughts.”

And it appears Beethoven and Einstein are not alone among history’s great geniuses. There are other examples.

For those who find walking too boring or just not their cup of tea, other physical exercises could possibly deliver similar results – exercises such as dancing, cycling or running for example.

Athletes, personal fitness trainers and sports medicine professionals are united in their opinion that exercise helps your mental function. Runners experience the pleasant – many say euphoric – runner’s high that comes with intense, sustained exercise. Such exercise (not just running) increases serotonin in the brain, leading to improved mental clarity.

 

To read more about walking and brain development check out GENIUS INTELLIGENCE: Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ http://www.amazon.com/GENIUS-INTELLIGENCE-Techniques-Technologies-Underground-ebook/dp/B00QXQQWXO/

 

GENIUS INTELLIGENCE: Secret Techniques and Technologies to Increase IQ (The Underground Knowledge Series Book 1)

 

To view the discussion thread on genius intelligence (the phenomenon) in our ‘Underground Knowledge’ group on Goodreads check out: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/142309-29-conspiracy-theories—a-discussion-group >>> Everyone’s welcome!

 

******************************************

Advertisements

One of the many interesting discussion threads in our ‘Underground Knowledge’ group on Goodreads.com reveals there is an exhaustive body of research that links the physical world with mental activity. In fact, Princeton University’s Princeton Engineering Anomalies Research (PEAR) recently completed a 28-year study on this very subject.

Princeton University, New Jersey

According to a press release issued by Princeton University, research staff focused on two major areas of study — anomalous human/machine interactions, which addresses the effects of consciousness on random physical systems and processes, and remote perception, wherein people attempt to acquire information about distant locations and events.

The article continues:

The enormous databases produced by PEAR provide clear evidence that human thought and emotion can produce measureable influences on physical reality.

We have accomplished what we originally set out to do 28 years ago, namely to determine whether these effects are real and to identify their major correlates.

There are still many important questions to be addressed that will require a coordinated interdisciplinary approach to the topic, but it is time for the next generation of scholars to take over.

 

Princeton’s PEAR studies show unequivocal evidence that thought can directly influence physical reality. As mentioned, this has inspired some some interesting debate in our ‘Underground Knowledge’ group.

To follow the debate, or better still to have YOUR say, go to: https://www.goodreads.com/topic/show/2168517-princeton-university-proves-that-thought-influences-physical-reality

 

***********************************