Posts Tagged ‘action adventure’

In the recent release action-adventure novel The Dogon Initiative, foreign mercenaries are hired as deniable assets by a newly-formed humanitarian division of the CIA. They’re tasked with saving Mali’s persecuted Dogon people from genocide. The operation must be carried out in stealth while journeying across some of West Africa’s most hostile terrain. As if all that’s not enough, they are also instructed to help solve an ancient astronomical mystery linked to the pyramids of Egypt.

 

The Dogon Initiative (The Deniables Book 1) by [Morcan, Lance, Morcan, James]

Book 1 in The Deniables Series.

 

THE DOGON INITIATIVE (The Deniables, Book 1)  is available via Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07NKTD515/

 

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In the following excerpt from our new adventure novel Into the Americas, we describe trading between the Mowachaht tribe and unscrupulous white traders in Nootka Sound, on Vancouver Island, in the early 1800’s.

Into the Americas (A novel based on a true story)

In the skies above North America’s west coast, amongst the clouds, a bald eagle glided in lazy circles. With her magnificent white head and tail feathers, and her six-foot wingspan, she was the queen of her domain as she made use of the thermals that rose from the unseen terrain below.

The clouds parted to reveal a village – one of many populated by the indigenous people of the remote Northwest Pacific region. Nootka village was bordered by rugged, forest-covered hills which rose up out of the sea. Comprised of twenty or so large, wooden lodges, it was home to the Mowachaht tribe, one of the twenty-five Nuu-chah-nulth indigenous groups that occupied the region’s craggy coastline. A two-masted schooner lay at anchor offshore, safe for the moment in an inlet with the unlikely name of Friendly Cove.

Distance was no problem for the eagle whose sharp eyesight could distinguish any object from another, even if those objects were little bigger than a pinhead. Right now, her eyes were focused on a Chinook salmon swimming between the schooner and shore. The eagle flattened her wings and dove head first, extending her wings moments before she struck the water. Talons extended and now in a shallow dive, the eagle grasped the salmon and, with a few mighty beats of her wings, rose sluggishly skyward with her catch.

The eagle’s labored flight took her directly over the village. If any of the villagers had been waiting for her, with bow or musket primed, they’d have shot her down easily for she was as yet barely higher than the colorful totem poles that lined the shore. Fortunately for her, eagles were sacred to these people and so they ruled the skies with impunity.

A trade was going down with a dozen crewmen from the schooner. Unkempt and ill disciplined, the crewmen were typical of the freebooters who visited these shores in increasing numbers. They carried with them an assortment of weapons and were clearly no strangers to violence.

Armed Mowachaht warriors, ever-mindful of bad experiences they’d had with other European traders, kept a wary eye on the visitors. Most were armed with muskets, some carried blunderbusses and a few bore traditional weapons, including clubs, spears and tomahawks.

The traders had come to exchange muskets for sea-otter pelts. Much sought-after, the beautiful pelts fetched a princely sum in the civilized world – especially in London and in Macau, China. Consequently, Nootka village and the sound named after it was an increasingly popular port of call for traders intent on filling their ships’ holds with the bounty of the New World.

Most of Nootka’s fifteen hundred residents were present to observe the trade, which was being conducted on a sandy beach in front of the village. Trading, especially with visiting Europeans, was a highlight of their short, hard lives. More so after the long winter months – as was the case on this pleasant spring day.

Among the Mowachahts, the common or untitled people wore sealskin and coarse cedar bark clothing, which afforded protection from the constant rain in these parts. The chiefs and men and women of high ranking wore animal skins and colorful capes or, in rare cases, the pelt of the sea-otter.

Headmen invariably wore the striking black sea otter pelt. It extended to the knees and was fastened around the waist by a wide band of colorful, woven cedar bark. The warriors wore square-cut, yellow mantles with holes cut for the arms – similar to those worn by the commoners except theirs were dyed red and were more basic.

Absent from the trading activities were the Mowachahts’ slaves. Acquired in raids on neighboring tribes, the slaves were readily identifiable as such as they collected firewood and performed other menial tasks in and around the village. Though they spoke the same Wakashan language as their Mowachaht masters, their appearance was quite different: each bore the physical characteristics of his or her tribe. Some were lighter skinned, others darker; some were tall and slender, others short and stocky; some male slaves were bald or wore their hair short, others wore their hair in long ringlets; most wore raggedy sealskin clothing while some were near-naked. Their number included almost as many females as males – the former more often than not serving as sex slaves as well as manual workers.

Above the beach, the Mowachahts’ lodges extended to the tree line. They were a sprawling collection of wooden dwellings, the remnants of a Spanish trading outpost vacated some years earlier. Smoke from cooking fires curled up into the sky from strategically placed openings in the lodges’ roofs.

The totem poles – some even taller than the surrounding fir trees – towered over the lodges.

On the beach, there was an air of tension as the schooner’s master, Captain Alvin Walsh, an abrasive New Yorker with a well deserved reputation for dishonest trades, bargained with a group of headmen. Foremost among the latter was Maquina, chief of the Mowachahts. Tall, bronze and muscular, the middle-aged Maquina cut an impressive figure in his ceremonial cloak. Feathers protruded from his long, black hair, which he wore as a bun on top of his head. Like all the headmen, white down covered his head and shoulders, conveying the impression of falling snow.

Captain Walsh’s steely gaze was fixed on the bundles of pelts that lay at his feet while Maquina’s hawk-like eyes were fixed on a dozen new muskets stacked end-to-end in an open casket. The casket lay on top of five identical unopened caskets.

Hard-nosed bartering had begun soon after the traders had stepped ashore earlier in the day and, to both parties, it seemed a successful trade was no closer. Tempers were becoming frayed.

Maquina pointed at the caskets and, in broken English, said, “Maquina say…five pelts…one musket.”

Walsh shook his head. “One musket…ten pelts.” He appeared ready to depart, a shrewd strategy he’d fine-tuned years earlier when trading watered-down whisky to the East Coast tribes.

The chief quickly nodded to his opposite, indicating they had a deal. Walsh gestured to his men who immediately began scooping up bundles of pelts.

Maquina intervened. “Try musket first,” he said.

Walsh cursed under his breath as he motioned to his men to hold off for the moment. He then selected a musket from the open casket and handed it to Maquina. The shrewd chief ignored the offering and selected another musket. He expertly primed it and fired it into the air. The shot echoed throughout Nootka Sound. Still suspicious, Maquina broke open another casket. He tested a second musket with the same result. Satisfied, he made the faintest of hand gestures to his warriors who immediately uplifted the caskets and carried them away.

A relieved Walsh motioned to his men to resume gathering up the pelts. Under Maquina’s penetrating gaze, the captain appeared tense and he exhorted his men to hurry.

There was good reason for Maquina’s suspicion. The Mowachahts – like all members of the wider Nuu-chah-nulth community – had been short-changed, and worse, by European traders. As the number of visiting trading vessels increased, so too had the number of unsavory incidents. The indiscriminate shooting of villagers by drunk or disgruntled traders was becoming almost commonplace and the rape and mistreatment of women even more so.

And so it was with some malevolence that Maquina and his people observed these latest traders as they ferried their trade items back to the waiting ship.

You have been reading an excerpt from INTO THE AMERICAS (A novel based on a true story). To read more go to Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Into-Americas-novel-based-story-ebook/dp/B00YJKM51E/

Into the Americas (A novel based on a true story)

 

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American historian, author and humanitarian Remy Benoit challenges readers to “pull up a chair, put your feet up and get ready to sail the high seas” in her 5-Star review of our historical adventure novel World Odyssey (The World Duology, #1).

Here’s Ms. Benoit’s review in full:

Are action, adventure, lust, profits, sailing on the open seas in “olden times” attractive to you? Then you will LOVE this book which is a major look into human behavior, human avarice, human hubris, and characters you care about—wish well, differ with, cheer on, be horrified by their self-serving ethnocentric views.

The world of yesteryear is on some levels quite strange to us. We are accustomed to doing things quickly; to instant communication; to fast travel.

The idea of a three, or six, month sea voyage, in constant danger of the ship being attacked by pirates, sunk in a big storm, be split open by a whale perhaps seems inconceivable to us. Breathing in the stench of bilge water in your ship’s cabin for the journey is noxious to our way of life, to our standards of civilization.

World Odyssey

And yet, and yet, these voyages were the way of things once upon a time and thousands of people endured them, left them, died during them. The stakes were high—big money, religious proselytizing.

Why would passengers subject themselves to such modes of travel—to reach destinations, to spread the word of God as they interpreted it to “heathen savages”, to make huge profits, to take up the “white man’s burden” of bringing “civilization” to ancient cultures as their expense; to escape hard labor imprisonment at penal colonies.

Imagine a world where natives of lands foreign to Europeans see large, masted ships come into their harbors. Some were welcoming, some were belligerent at being so invaded. Some were peaceful peoples; some were warlike with a vast interest in muskets to use against their opponent tribes.

World Odyssey

All were considered “fair game” to wheel and deal with; all were considered by most visitors and new settlers inferior beings to the whites who felt they were being gracious to bring advanced civilization and exploitation to them at will.

Three characters from very different backgrounds are finding their way to Fiji.

One is a sailor, captured from a sinking vessel, and held as a slave of a Northwestern tribe along the now coast of Washington state.

One is a blacksmith, sent to a penal colony where ‘cruel and unusual’ treatment is the way of it simply because he stole from his boss who wouldn’t pay him something of lesser value than the actual wages owed. Some “criminals”, starving or unwilling to let their children starve, sent there for years for the crime of stealing a loaf of bread.

World Odyssey

One is the daughter of a pastor whose desire for the tall handsome rigger on the ship muddles her mind, vexes her maturing body, challenges her religious upbringing.

When we are young we have no idea where life and its events will lead us.

Certainly none of our three companions on this journey considered as youngsters a destination of Fiji. And that is one of the things that this book has to offer you—changes in people, growth, successes, failures, conviction, acceptance of challenges, slips into negative behavior—all three on distance paths, all three coming together on a land far, far away from all they had known before of the world, of themselves.

Get to know these characters, they are unforgettable and have a huge adventure before them. Set sail with them, be searing hot, or viciously cold with them. Feel the doubt, the desire, the seasickness, the passions, the terrors, their entire upbringing and ask “Are they up to this incredible journey?” Once you get to know Susannah, Jack, and Nathan in this prequel you will just have to know where their journey led them and if they were up to it!

World Odyssey

Pull up a chair, put your feet up and get ready to sail the high seas and feel intensely every moment of the voyage! The Morcan writing team of father and son never lets you down! They will make you ask, truly ask, aside from the expediency of travel and communication of today, just how much the world has changed; just how much we are still committed to huge profits, people and the earth be damned; just how much we still think in terms of “the white man’s burden”; and just how much do we still use women as if they were throwaway objects?

Oh yes, and while you are there, do order Fiji which continues this amazing journey!

Bon voyage. –Amazon reviewer Remy Benoit

 

World Odyssey (The World Duology, #1) is available via Amazon at:

http://www.amazon.com/World-Odyssey-Duology-1-ebook/dp/B00HHVOMO0/

  

Happy reading! –Lance & James

 

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Newly released World Odyssey (The World Duology, #1) resonates with readers and book critics alike, so far attracting all 5-star reviews from Amazon reviewers.

World Odyssey follows the fortunes of three young travelers as each embarks on an epic journey. Their dramatic adventures span sixteen years and see them engage with American Indians, Barbary Coast pirates, Aborigines, Maoris and Pacific Islanders as they travel around the world – from America to Africa, from England to the Canary Islands, to Australia, New Zealand and Samoa.

Here’s a snapshot of what Amazon reviewers are saying about this novel:

“A highly readable…novel…Download this now!!” -Alice M. Dinizo

“A rip-roaring historical adventure…a heroic journey.” -‘Cloud’

“I felt as if I were a passenger…in exotic locales.” -Sheri A. Wilkinson

“Great Historical Saga…a cast of intriguing characters who are motivated by their own dreams. -Karine Bregeon

Readers are reminded World Odyssey is book one and Fiji: A Novel is book two in the new-release The World Duology

  

 

 

        Available as kindle ebooks on Amazon

If these books sound like you, here’s the appropriate kindle ebook links:

World Odyssey (The World Duology, #1): http://www.amazon.com/World-Odyssey-Duology-1-ebook/dp/B00HHVOMO0/

Fiji: A Novel (The World Duology, #2): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0057YCZM0/

The World Duology (World Odyssey / Fiji: A Novel): http://www.amazon.com/World-Duology-Odyssey-Fiji-Novel-ebook/dp/B00HMQRMFG/

 

Happy reading! –Lance & James

 

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“The moral of this tale is that you don’t ever, ever abduct the young son of your best and most dangerous operative.” – That’s according to c9c Reviews’ Andrew Thompson in his Amazon review of our conspiracy thriller The Orphan Uprising (The Orphan Trilogy, #3).

Thriller resonates

Andrew’s 4-Star review lowers this novel’s 5-Star average rating (to 4.9 Stars) on Amazon. However, it’s such an insightful review we thought we’d share it with you…

Be careful who you kidnap

The moral of this tale is that you don’t ever, ever abduct the young son of your best and most dangerous operative. Such people will go to great lengths to get their children back, especially as they are very aware of the horrors that await their offspring.

Nine does his very best to look after his pregnant wife while attempting to rescue his son. His employers should have known better and they learn their lesson. Nine is hampered by a heart ailment, but despite this he manages to keep his promises to his family.

Another, final, installment of the Orphan series which does not disappoint.

For a brief synopsis of The Orphan Uprising see c9c Reviews’ blurb at: http://c9creviews.com/

For more reviews of this novel go to: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BFC66DM/

 

Happy reading! –Lance & James

 

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Check out this Goodreads.com list of novels that have mind control as a major theme in their plots. Ranked according to Goodreads’ members votes, the books in our conspiracy thriller series The Orphan Trilogy occupy the first four places on the list!

Here’s the top 10 books (ranked 1-10) on Goodreads’ Mind Control Fiction popularity list courtesy of Listopia:

The Ninth Orphan (The Orpha... The Ninth Orphan (The Orphan Trilogy, #1) byJames Morcan 3.65 of 5 stars 3.65 avg rating — 328 ratings
The Orphan Trilogy The Orphan Trilogy byJames Morcan 4.55 of 5 stars 4.55 avg rating — 47 ratings
The Orphan Uprising (The Or... The Orphan Uprising (The Orphan Trilogy, #3) byJames Morcan 4.44 of 5 stars 4.44 avg rating — 68 ratings
The Orphan Factory (The Orp... The Orphan Factory (The Orphan Trilogy, #2) byJames Morcan 4.27 of 5 stars 4.27 avg rating — 100 ratings
Manchurian Candidate Manchurian Candidate byRichard Condon 4.03 of 5 stars 4.03 avg rating — 9,163 ratings
1984 1984 byGeorge Orwell 4.08 of 5 stars 4.08 avg rating — 1,133,976 ratings
Scott Bloom en de Dochters ... Scott Bloom en de Dochters van Chenchen byRosa Miller (Goodreads Author) 4.29 of 5 stars 4.29 avg rating — 14 ratings
Animal Farm Animal Farm byGeorge Orwell 3.78 of 5 stars 3.78 avg rating — 1,176,284 ratings
Brave New World Brave New World byAldous Huxley 3.92 of 5 stars 3.92 avg rating — 663,648 ratings
The Stepford Wives The Stepford Wives byIra Levin 3.61 of 5 stars 3.61 avg rating — 11,056 ratings

For the top 100 novels on this list go to: https://www.goodreads.com/list/show/11984.Mind_Control_Fiction#13250061

Occupying first place, The Ninth Orphan is book one in The Orphan Trilogy. Here’s the storyline for anyone interested:

An orphan grows up to become an assassin for a highly secretive organization. When he tries to break free and live a normal life, he is hunted by his mentor and father figure, and by a female orphan he spent his childhood with. On the run, the mysterious man’s life becomes entwined with his beautiful French-African hostage and a shocking past riddled with the darkest of conspiracies is revealed.

Fast-paced, totally fresh and original, filled with deep and complex characters, The Ninth Orphan is a controversial, high-octane thriller with an edge. Merging fact with fiction, it illuminates shadow organizations rumored to actually exist in our world. The novel explores a plethora of conspiracies involving real organizations like the CIA, MI6, and the UN, and public figures such as President Obama as well as the Clinton, Marcos and Bush families.

The Ninth Orphan (The Orphan Trilogy, #1) is available via Amazon as a trade paperback and Kindle ebook. Here’s the Kindle link: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0056I4FKC

 

Happy reading! –Lance & James

 

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Lovers of historical fiction will be pleased to know the Kindle ebook price of our new release series The World Duology (World Odyssey / Fiji: A Novel) has been slashed as part of our book launch.

Two books in one in The World Duology

Readers will receive two novels in one at a real sharp price until the new book launch promo ends February 9th PST.

Meanwhile, World Odyssey and Fiji: A Novel, books one and two in the duology, remain regular visitors to Amazon’s bestseller lists in their appropriate categories in historical fiction. And readers continue to resonate with both novels if reviewers’ ratings and comments are anything to go by.

Set in the nineteenth century, The World Duology follows the fortunes of three young travelers. Their dramatic adventures span sixteen years and see them engage with American Indians, Barbary Coast pirates, Aborigines, Maoris and Pacific Islanders as they travel around the world – from America to Africa, from England to the Canary Islands, to Australia, New Zealand, Samoa and Fiji.

If these books sound like you, here’s the appropriate kindle ebook links:

World Odyssey (The World Duology, #1): http://www.amazon.com/World-Odyssey-Duology-1-ebook/dp/B00HHVOMO0/

Fiji: A Novel (The World Duology, #2): http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0057YCZM0/

The World Duology (World Odyssey / Fiji: A Novel): http://www.amazon.com/World-Duology-Odyssey-Fiji-Novel-ebook/dp/B00HMQRMFG/

 

Happy reading! –Lance & James

 

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