Posts Tagged ‘contemporary romance’

“The moral of this tale is that you don’t ever, ever abduct the young son of your best and most dangerous operative.” – That’s according to c9c Reviews’ Andrew Thompson in his Amazon review of our conspiracy thriller The Orphan Uprising (The Orphan Trilogy, #3).

Thriller resonates

Andrew’s 4-Star review lowers this novel’s 5-Star average rating (to 4.9 Stars) on Amazon. However, it’s such an insightful review we thought we’d share it with you…

Be careful who you kidnap

The moral of this tale is that you don’t ever, ever abduct the young son of your best and most dangerous operative. Such people will go to great lengths to get their children back, especially as they are very aware of the horrors that await their offspring.

Nine does his very best to look after his pregnant wife while attempting to rescue his son. His employers should have known better and they learn their lesson. Nine is hampered by a heart ailment, but despite this he manages to keep his promises to his family.

Another, final, installment of the Orphan series which does not disappoint.

For a brief synopsis of The Orphan Uprising see c9c Reviews’ blurb at: http://c9creviews.com/

For more reviews of this novel go to: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BFC66DM/

 

Happy reading! –Lance & James

 

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Books to read in 2014: From Murakami to Moore and more

Posted in #Chicago blog by Laura Pearson on Jan 8, 2014
From Going Clear to Tenth of December, from The Flamethrowers to less-talked-about-but-no-less-brilliant books (i.e., Mindsploitation), 2013 was a good year for reading. 2014 carries on strong, with a slew of noteworthy debut novels, new works by local authors and fresh fiction by familiar names such as E.L. Doctorow, Haruki Murakami and Lorrie Moore. With all the staring at screens we do, our resolution is to better balance a mostly web-based media diet with a healthy serving of escapist lit—both smart fiction and transporting nonfiction. No disrespect to e-readers, but we’re talking real books on real paper. Printed matter. Gutenberg shit. Here’s what will top our bedside stack of books this year. (It’s a tall stack.)

Little Failure by Gary Shteyngart (Random House, $27) The satirical novelist and prolific blurber‘s first memoir recalls his aspirations, struggles and family’s immigration to the U.S. from the Soviet Union. Out now.

Words Will Break Cement: The Passion of Pussy Riot by Masha Gessen (Riverhead, $16) Examining the arrest and incarceration of Russian punk band Pussy Riot, which captured international attention, this book by a Russian-American journalist was published early due to two members’ release from prison. Out now.

A Highly Unlikely Scenario, or a Neetsa Pizza Employee’s Guide to Saving the World by Rachel Cantor (Melville House, $16.95) In a future world where competing fast-food factions rule, an employee at a pizza chain manages the complaints hotline. It’s a mind-numbing job—until he’s contacted by a 13th-century explorer named Marco. Drawing comparisons to A Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy and Shteyngart’s Super Sad True Love Story, this debut novel sounds anything but boring. Jan 14.

The Last Days of California by Mary Miller (Liveright, $24.95) We enjoyed Miller’s story collection, Big World, and don’t want to be left behind in reading her first novel, about a family from Montgomery, Alabama, on a westward road trip in anticipation of the Rapture. Jan 20.

Andrew’s Brain by E.L. Doctorow (Random House, $26) Exploring themes of truth and memory, Doctorow tells the story of a man with a habit of wreaking havoc. Jan 26.

Silence Once Begun by Jesse Ball (Pantheon, $23.95) The Chicago-based author of Samedi the Deafness and The Curfew returns with a story of the “Narito Disappearances,” in which eight people vanish from their homes in the same Japanese town, a single playing card left on each door. A journalist—also named Jesse Ball—is swept into the case. Jan 28.

A Life in Men by Gina Frangello (Algonquin, $15) The Chicago novelist, editor of The Nervous Breakdown and Sunday Editor of The Rumpus publishes her third book of fiction, about a woman with cystic fibrosis attempting to understand why a relationship with her best friend unraveled years prior—an investigation that leads to both questionable decisions and valuable discoveries. Feb 4.

The Dismal Science by Peter Mountford (Tin House, $15.95) A novel about identity, rationality and starting over, Mountford’s book follows a former VP at the World Bank as he tries to rebuild his life following a series of scandals and losses. Feb 11.

Bark by Lorrie Moore (Knopf, $24.95) Moore is often praised for her humor but we find many of her stories depressing. In particular, her most recent novel, A Gate at the Stairs, felt emotionally unsatisfying. That said, we’re still eager to read her first new collection in 15 years. The form suits her. Less is Moore. Feb 26.

A Man Called Destruction: The Life and Music of Alex Chilton, From Box Tops to Big Star to Backdoor Man by Holly George-Warren (Viking, $27.95) The first biography of the teen rock star, Big Star frontman, dishwasher and influential solo artist (in that order) was written by a Chilton acquaintance and draws on interviews with more than 100 bandmates, family members and friends. In the words of Big Star: Thank you, friends. Mar 20.

Every Day Is for the Thief by Teju Cole (Random House, $23) Revised and updated, this 2007 book by Nigerian-American writer Cole (Open City) was originally published in Africa and now makes its highly anticipated English-language debut. Mar 25.

You Feel So Mortal by Peggy Shinner (University of Chicago Press, $22) In a series of essays, the Chicago-based writer considers the body through various lenses—historical,  social and political—and via topics such as bras, feet and hair. Apr 1.

Let Go and Go On and On by Tim Kinsella (Curbside Splendor, $15,95) We’re fascinated by the premise of Kinsella’s second novel, a fictional riff on what happened to real-life cult actress Laurie Bird, who appeared in the films Two Lane Blacktop, Cockfighter and Annie Hall before committing suicide at age 26. Told in the second person, the novel considers the timeless lure of celebrity. Apr 15.

Walter Potter’s Curious World of Taxidermy by Dr. Pat Morris with Joanna Epstein (Blue Rider Press, $19.95) We wish we could go back in time and visit the quirky collection of curios of Walter Potter, a country taxidermist who created storybook-like scenes of kitten tea parties and sword-fighting squirrels. This book, stocked with photos, is the next best thing. Apr 17.

To Rise Again at a Decent Hour by Joshua Ferris (Little, Brown, $26) This novel follows the life of Paul O’Rourke, a man of many contradictions (i.e., a dentist who smokes), as someone begins to impersonate him online—and pretty well, creepily enough. It considers the real versus the virtual aspects of everyday life, and the absurdity of both. May 6.

An Untamed State by Roxane Gay (Grove Press, $16) In her first novel, Gay—co-editor of PANK, essays editor for The Rumpus and teacher at Eastern Illinois University (among other things; she’s everywhere!)—writes of a Haitian woman kidnapped for ransom, and what happens when her father refuses to pay her captors. May 6.

The WORN Archive: A Fashion Journal about the Art, Ideas, & History of What We Wear by Serah-Marie McMahon (Drawn and Quarterly, $29.95) This best-of collection of the smart Canadian fashion journal explores the places where fashion, art and pop culture intersect. Seems like a must-read for people who love clothes but, for example, hate the word “clothes horse.” May 6.

The 40s: The Story of a Decade by the New Yorker Magazine (Random House, $30) This portrait of an endlessly fascinating decade, from the perspective of The New Yorker, features contributors old and new, including Elizabeth Bishop, John Cheever, Shirley Jackson, Jill Lepore, Susan Orlean and Zadie Smith. May 6.

Once I Was Cool by Megan Stielstra (Curbside Splendor, $15.95) The seasoned storyteller—who, in addition to teaching and writing, has performed at Chicago’s 2nd Story storytelling series for more than a decadepresents a collection of personal essays that sounds quite cool. May 13.

Another Great Day at Sea: Life Aboard the USS George H.W. Bush by Geoff Dyer (Pantheon, $24.95) The veteran writer recalls his time aboard the American aircraft carrier and his lifelong fascination with military service. May 20.

The Book of Unknown Americans by Cristina Henríquez (Knopf, $24.95) The Chicago writer’s highly anticipated novel tells the love story of a Pananamian boy and Mexican girl—the latter of whom suffers a near-fatal accident—and the language, racial and cultural obstacles their families face in America. Jun 3.

Paper Lantern: Love Stories by Stuart Dybek (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, $24) The distinguished author of I Sailed with Magellan and The Coast of Chicago publishes a collection of love stories, the titular one of which first appeared in The New Yorker in 1995. Jun 3.

Nobody Is Ever Missing by Catherine Lacey (FSG Originals, $14) In this new novel, a woman abruptly leaves her life in Manhattan, including a husband who has no idea what happened to her, on a one-way flight to New Zealand. There, she drifts farther into unknown territory—emotionally, mentally, as well as physically. Jul 8.

California by Edan Lepucki (Little, Brown, $26) Lepucki’s debut is an inventive take on the post-apocalytic novel, about a couple who moves from an isolated existence in the wilderness to a guarded community that, they soon realize, harbors terrifying secrets and unforeseen dangers. We’ll probably read this one on the morning commute instead of at bedtime. Jul 8.

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage by Haruki Murakami (Knopf, $25) The English translation of the latest work by the much-loved Japanese writer arrives this summer. Thousands of people lined up at Tokyo bookstores at midnight to buy a copy. Aug 12.

Ancient Oceans of Kentucky by David Connerley Nahm (Two Dollar Radio, $15.50) Exploring small-town life in the middle of Kentucky, this debut novel tells the story of Leah, whose brother, Jacob, disappeared during their childhood. Now, as an adult, she directs a nonprofit organization, and a man shows up at work claiming to be Jacob. We anticipate a haunting and riveting read. Aug 12.

The Organized Mind: Thinking Straight in the Age of Information Overload by Daniel J. Levitin (Dutton, $27.95) What can we distractible types learn from those who manage to stay focused in a hyperconnected, details-drenched, technology-dependent world? Levitin lets us know. Aug 19.

The Fame Lunches: On Wounded Icons, Money, Sex, the Importance of Handbags, and Other Cultural Inquiries by Daphne Merkin (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $27) The former New Yorker columnist examines faded icons, famous writers and the pervasive desire for celebrity in our present world. Aug 19.

A Load of Hooey by Bob Odenkirk (McSweeney’s, $24) We’re not quite sure what to expect from this first book by the hilarious comedian-writer, which promises to contain absurdist monologues, intentionally bad theater and “free-verse more powerful than the work of Calvin Trillin, Jewel and Robert Louis Stevenson combined”—besides utter hilarity. Sept 9.

A Different Bed Every Time by Jac Jemc (Dzanc Books, price not yet listed) Following her highly praise poetic novel, My Only Wife, the Chicago writer, poetry editor of decomP and fiction web editor for Hobart returns with a story collection this fall. Don’t miss it. October.

RECOMMENDED: Best books of 2013

To read more go to TimeOutChicago’s excellent blog at: http://www.timeoutchicago.com/arts-culture/books/16524926/books-to-read-in-2014-from-murakami-to-moore-and-more

Happy reading! –Lance & James

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In her revised and significantly expanded second edition of Writing a Killer Thriller, award-winning author Jodie Renner names our thriller series The Orphan Trilogy (The Ninth Orphan / The Orphan Factory / The Orphan Uprising) as a good example of a series thriller writers should read.

Recommended series

Ms Renner lists The Orphan Trilogy alongside selected works of James Patterson, Michael Crichton, Steve Berry, David Ignatius and others, describing them as “Thrillers that take you all over the world…Great for the armchair traveler!”

As the author says in her description of Writing a Killer Thriller: An Editor’s Guide to Writing Compelling Fiction:

Whether you’re planning your first novel or revising your fourth, you’ll discover lots of concrete ideas here for taking your fiction up a level or two, captivating readers, and gaining fans. Both published and aspiring authors of fast-paced, popular fiction will find these tips indispensable for plotting a riveting story and creating compelling characters, then writing a gripping opening and designing suspenseful scenes.

We haven’t read Writing a Killer Thriller yet. (Have been too busy writing to read unfortunately!). However, it’s on our ever-growing list of books to read. When we do, watch this space for our review.

Meanwhile, here’s a selection of reviews plucked from Amazon:

“Finally, someone who understands the thriller! More than ever an author must also be his own best editor and Jodie Renner is there to help. Writing a Killer Thriller should be on every thriller writer’s desk. It breaks down the thriller into its must-have component parts to write a scintillating, edge of the seat novel that will get readers buzzing and sales flowing.” ~ Robert Dugoni, New York Times bestselling author of The Jury Master and Murder One

“Writing a Killer Thriller by Jodie Renner is an in-depth journey through each component of the thriller. Renner breaks down the process into key elements, each essential to keeping the reader turning those pages. From character development to building suspense, Writing a Killer Thriller should be on the desk of every thriller author out there. A staple for the beginner, a refresher for the pro.” ~ Joe Moore, #1 Amazon and international bestselling co-author of The Blade and The Phoenix Apostles

“A killer of a thriller guide! Jodie Renner lays out, in clear, easy steps and lists, how the best writers craft their works of art – and shows how you can do it, too. A terrific how-to in avoiding the pitfalls and burnishing the gotta-haves of writing a bestselling thriller novel, by an editor who knows her way around action, drama and creating characters so fresh and real you’ll swear they were your friends.” ~ Shane Gericke, national bestselling and No. 1 Kindle bestselling author of Torn Apart

 

Warning: blatant advertising ahead!

The Orphan Trilogy is available as a Kindle ebook at: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BGGM05U/

 

Happy reading! –Lance & James

 

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                                                                          To be released soon!

The Orphan Conspiracies: 29 Conspiracy Theories from The Orphan Trilogy will be a departure from the usual for us: it’s non-fiction whereas all our other published titles to date – including The Orphan Trilogy (The Ninth Orphan / The Orphan Factory / The Orphan Uprising) and Fiji: A Novel – are works of fiction.

Most of our research into conspiracy theories comes from scoping and writing The Orphan Trilogy between 2004 and 2013. The Orphan Conspiracies will highlight the 29 conspiracies that feature in the trilogy, and will provide in depth studies of each with additional comment.

Dedicated to truth-seekers and whistleblowers everywhere, just some of the conspiracies featured will include False Flag operations, MK-Ultra and the secret history of mind control, human cloning, the US Federal Reserve, suppressed technologies, Bilderberg, the pharmaceutical conspiracy, the myth of a free media, Project Paperclip, secret CIA prisons, Area 52 and, most appropriately, experimentation on orphans…and many more.

Meanwhile, The Orphan Trilogy continues to be a regular visitor to Amazon’s bestseller lists. While the series has fictional characters, it shines the spotlight on real organizations and also on shadow groups rumored to exist in the real world. In many ways it merges fiction with reality.

           

The Orphan Trilogy thriller series is available via Amazon at:         http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BGGM05U/

As one Amazon reviewer said of The Ninth Orphan (book one in the trilogy):

The authors manage to weave political intrigue, espionage, and eugenics into an exciting fabric of mystery and entertainment. The reader can’t but believe that the novel may not be only a work of fiction.

The Orphan Conspiracies will help readers bridge the gap between fact and fiction…

Watch this space! –Lance & James

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Book three in our conspiracy thriller series The Orphan Trilogy has maintained its average 5-star rating with Amazon reviewers with a stellar review from Lynelle Clark, Editor of the respected ‘Aspired Writer’ literary blog.

The Orphan Uprising

Here’s Ms Clark’s (abridged) review:

***** Great end to a series

A sad but fitting ending to a great series. It was my privilege to read all three books in this series, and what a wonderful and exciting read it was.

Book 3 continued years later with Nine and Seventeen as the main characters. Isabella in her supporting role as wife, mother and sister-in-law brought the human aspect back in as their struggle continue to outrun and outwit the Omega Agency.

This time the Agency’s target was Nine’s son, seven year old Francis. Abducted from his home, we once again traveled the world with Nine as he searched for his son. As always you are drawn into the plot as it unfolds with its many layers, that kept you guessing and hoping until the very end…

Fast paced and well written the story meet up with the family, Isabella far advance in her second pregnancy, and Nine struggling with a heart condition when their son is abducted. It took all of Nine’s skills to search and destroy the Agency that once trained him. Now he used everything he knew against them, running against time to get his son from this diabolic group.

Led by Naylor, they did everything they could to prevent Nine…This man was brutal, ruthless, and a heartless bastard with no emotions as he tried to catch Nine and Isabella, using people as he wished with no second thought. Their was no remorse as he hunts them down, his main objective to get them out of the way to go ahead with his cloning project, with Francis as his main focus…

I loved the way the authors brought in each orphan as Nine and Seventeen met them, reminiscing about their youth before they did the ultimate…As always the book was filled with descriptive and in-depth scenes, interesting characters and great story line. From Tahiti, Greenland, America and to the heart of the DRC this was evident. Plotting and scheming with Drug Lords and Militia Captain’s to get the job done…

Nine’s determination, skills and cunningness put him ahead of the Agency, willing to risk all to save his son. His humanity more at the forefront as he raced against his own heart problems, not willing to stop until…

A great book and series I can recommend to all readers who loves a good spy thriller with all the elements of action, adventure and humanity inside to give you hours of enjoyable reads…Loved it.

For Lynelle Clark’s full review go to:  http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BFC66DM/

For anyone interested in The Orphan Trilogy box set (3 books in 1) go to: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BGGM05U/

 

The Orphan Trilogy (The Ninth Orphan / The Orphan Factory / The Orphan Uprising) 

                                               

Happy reading! –Lance & James

 

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Our conspiracy thriller The Ninth Orphan (The Orphan Trilogy, #1) has entered Amazon’s bestseller list in the popular Conspiracy category for kindle ebooks. This follows yesterday’s announcement that our historical adventure romance, Fiji: A Novel, has also entered Amazon’s bestseller list.

In book one in The Orphan Trilogy, Nine – the ninth-born orphan – grows up to become an assassin for a highly secretive organization. When he tries to break free and live a normal life, he is hunted by his mentor and father figure, and by a female orphan he spent his childhood with. On the run, the mysterious man’s life becomes entwined with his beautiful French-African hostage and a shocking past riddled with the darkest of conspiracies is revealed.

But can the ninth-born orphan ever get off the grid? To find out you’ll need to go on a tumultuous journey around the globe to such far-flung locations as China, France, the Philippines, Andorra, America, England, Germany and French Polynesia. The frenetic cat-and-mouse chase moves from airports to train stations and hidden torture prisons, taking the reader on a shocking, nail-biting ride into the world’s closet of skeletons that goes beyond conspiracy theories to painful reality.

Fast-paced, totally fresh and original, filled with deep and complex characters, The Ninth Orphan is a controversial, high-octane thriller with an edge. Merging fact with fiction, it illuminates shadow organizations rumored to actually exist in our world. The novel explores a plethora of conspiracies involving real organizations like the CIA, MI6, and the UN, and public figures such as President Obama as well as the Clinton, Marcos and Bush families.

Tackling genetic selection, mind control and secret societies, The Ninth Orphan exposes a global agenda designed to keep the power in the hands of a select few. The novel’s antagonists are members of a shadow government acting above and beyond the likes of the White House, the FBI, the Pentagon and the NSA. Could something like this ever take place? Or, is it already taking place right now?

This unique and unpredictable thriller also has a poignant, romantic sub-plot. The story contains the kind of intimate character portraits usually associated with psychological novels.

Buckle up for a wild trip full of death-defying action, cloak and dagger intrigue, unexpected role reversals and surprise endings.

Here’s what reviewers have to say about The Ninth Orphan:

★★★★★    “Nail biter to the end.” -My Scribe World
★★★★★    “One hell of a great story.” -Random Writings Book Reviews
★★★★        “If you’re keen on spy stories, international espionage or conspiracy theories, give this fast-paced book a try!” -Coffee2Words Reviews
★★★★★    “I was drawn into the world of espionage, assassins and DNA alterations.”
-Lynelle Clark (author of ‘A Pirate’s Wife’)
★★★★★    “Intense suspense that will keep you up at night turning pages.” -Phoenix Book Review
★★★★        “A slick spy thriller.” -Two Ends of the Pen
★★★★★    “A major must read!” -A Bit Of Everything Reviews
★★★★★    “Action packed – intense – gripping – edge of the seat.” -Review of Books For You

★★★★★    “For any spy thriller fan The Ninth Orphan is not to be missed!” -Vickie McKeehan (author of ‘The Evil Trilogy’)  

                 

If you want to see what readers and critics like about The Ninth Orphan, visit it at Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/dp/B0056I4FKC

 

Happy reading! –Lance & James

 

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The following interview with James Morcan, co-author of our conspiracy thriller series, The Orphan Trilogy (The Ninth Orphan / The Orphan Factory / The Orphan Uprising) appeared in today’s edition of the prestigious Chicago web publication Gapers Block. You’ll see its interest in the trilogy stems from the fact that Chicago – and, indeed, Illinois – features prominently throughout.

 

GAPERS ★★★★ BLOCK

TODAY Thursday, September 12

 

The Orphan Trilogy’s Chicago connection

By Kathryn Pulkrabek

 

Good spies aren’t born; they’re made. Such is the case for the genetically altered spies in The Orphan Trilogy, a series of international conspiracy thrillers by New Zealand authors James Morcan and Lance Morcan.

Orphan_Trilogy.jpg

Chicago is featured prominently as the site of the Pedemont Orphanage, where 23 orphans acquire the skills to become stealthy, cold-blooded killers. James Morcan was happy to shed some light on how the city’s famed work ethic influenced the decision to begin the story here,  and to discuss whether we’ll see any Pedemont Orphanage alums skulking around Chicago corners in the near future…

Image of James Morcan
Trilogy co-author James

Q: The books of The Orphan Trilogy take place in a variety of exotic locales… Why did you choose Chicago, a city with blue-collar roots in America’s heartland, as the site of the Pedemont Orphanage, the place where it all began?

Even though the orphans in our series were genetically engineered by an extremely wealthy organization, their masters want them to develop “everyman” qualities in order for them to eventually be able to integrate with wherever they go. Being a working-class city, Chicago seemed like the ideal location as soon as we started writing the trilogy.

It’s also a city where the history is evident and the ghosts of earlier generations can be felt almost everywhere — generations who built the city brick by brick and through blood, sweat and tears. It’s not Los Angeles or Las Vegas or Miami. In fact, it’s the antithesis of those cities in many ways. Chicago always struck me as a more traditional American city where hard work is respected more than anything else. The folks I have met from Chicago and Illinois in general seem to me to be people who aim to do things well and with integrity. And those are precisely the values that the head of the Pedemont Orphanage, Tommy Kentbridge, wants to instil in the orphans for them to become the ultimate spies.

Q: What’s your relationship to Chicago? What kind of research did you conduct to create a snapshot of Chicago in the 1970s?

I visited Chicago on my travels not long after leaving high school in the late 1990s. I remember arriving via Amtrak at Chicago’s Union Station at about three a.m. and waiting in the Loop for the sun to rise. I remember seeing the city slowly awaken and then swarms of people arriving for a new day’s work. This experience remained vivid in my mind for some reason, and it inspired a sequence in The Orphan Factory (book two in the series) where Nine, our lead character, is running through the city center at dawn. Being a New Zealander, so much of America was foreign to me at first, but Chicago instantly felt familiar and friendly.

We did have to do quite a bit of research to ensure that late 1970s Chicago, which is when the trilogy starts, was portrayed accurately. We discovered the city has changed a lot with certain communities being quite different between then and now, or in some cases are no longer recognizable.

Q: The Orphan Trilogy shows us that institutions are not necessarily to be trusted, while Number Nine’s individualism is the key to his freedom. Which institutions, organizations and events in particular inspired this view, and who are some individuals you admire for pursuing freedom at any cost?

A combination of things inspired The Orphan Trilogy. Certain events like the bailout of corporations ahead of regular citizens during the global financial crisis and the invasion of vulnerable mineral-rich countries post-9/11, certainly influenced our writing. In recent times, more and more citizens seem to be sensing there must be authorities within governments that are not “for the people,” but actually against the people. More than anything else, we believe that’s why our series is proving to be popular and is establishing a loyal fan base of readers worldwide.

Nine does indeed have that spark of individualism which manifests as rebellion against his masters. Yet he also represents every person who desires justice and freedom. Individuals who we admire and who influenced our themes in the series include Nelson Mandela, Bobby Kennedy, Martin Luther King, Julian Assange and Mahatma Gandhi.

Q: The trilogy’s first novel, The Ninth Orphan, is being developed as a feature film. Any chance that you will shoot on location in Chicago? Which actor would you like to see cast as Number Nine?

The Ninth Orphan film adaptation will be shot partly in Chicago and Illinois. Other locations will include Paris, Beijing, London and Manila. We have the perfect actor in mind for the lead role, but as we are also film producers, we learned long ago never to mention an actor’s name until negotiations are complete. Sorry if that sounds evasive…I guess the film industry and spy fields have much in common!

Q: The orphans are endowed with some amazing genetically enhanced abilities. If you could give yourself such an ability, what would it be?

Mentally speaking, speed-reading would be handy, as would being able to speak a large number of languages. Physically, I’d love to be a martial arts genius like the orphans are. As we mention in the novels, though, their advanced DNA is only one side of the equation, and these orphans are certainly not super heroes or anything like that. That’s just the “nature” side. There is also the “nurture” side, which is where their comprehensive education comes in. Having gone through the traditional education system and finding it laborious and uninspiring, it was fun to write about a more accelerated form of education inside the Pedemont Orphanage.

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For the full article go to Gapers Block: http://gapersblock.com/bookclub/2013/09/12/the_orphan_trilogys_chicago_connection/

The Orphan Trilogy 3-in-1 box set is available via Amazon at:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BGGM05U/

 

Happy reading! –Lance

 

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